Wittgenstein’s overlooked insight

Sometimes it seems there can no longer be any low-hanging fruit in the Wittgenstein scholarship. After so many extensive commentaries on his work by prominent philosophers, can we still hope to discover in his opus easily derivable but new and striking insights? Yes. The demonstration follows. Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent. … More Wittgenstein’s overlooked insight

Timothy Williamson and Simon Blackburn criticize Tony Blair—and miss

          In his new book Timothy Williamson, the Wykeham Professor of Logc at Oxford, writes: Descartes’ starting point for reconstructing knowledge was his knowledge of his own inner thought. That too still has strange echoes. In March 2003 the United States under President George W. Bush and the United Kingdom under … More Timothy Williamson and Simon Blackburn criticize Tony Blair—and miss

Kripke proposes a language reform to advance world peace

          Many regard Saul Kripke as the world’s greatest living philosopher. He is also routinely described as a genius. In an article recently published in a leading philosophy journal Kripke spells out advantages of the view he calls “affirmativism”, i.e. adopting a language that doesn’t contain the word “false”: More important, … More Kripke proposes a language reform to advance world peace

The ICTY verdict and its illogicalities

In this text—first published in Croatian on December 24, 2011—I criticized the verdict of the ICTY (International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia) which found two Croatian generals guilty of war crimes and sentenced them to 24 and 18 years of imprisonment, respectively. Several months after the appearance of my article the Appeal Chamber of … More The ICTY verdict and its illogicalities

Sounds of (philosophers’) silence

More than a year ago I published an article, Study Philosophy to Improve Thinking—A Case of False Advertising?, in which I defended the following claim: the world’s leading philosophy departments try to attract students by announcing, without offering any evidence, that studying philosophy improves thinking and builds skills that are useful in all kinds of jobs. … More Sounds of (philosophers’) silence